Art et contestation Agrandir

Art et contestation

par Laure Canadas.

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460696

9782350306964

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LA référence pour le Capes d’Anglais

  • Hauteur : 17,8 cm
  • Largeur : 12 cm
  • Nombre de pages : 288
  • Reliure : broché

Remarques préliminaires sur les épreuves du CAPES . 13

“Art et contestation” : cadrage du B.O.. . . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . ..  . .. . .. . .14
    Thématique “Arts et débats d’idées” (extrait du B.O.). . 14
    Axe d’étude 1 : Art et contestation . 15
    Thème et axe d’étude. . 16

Structure et intérêts du présent ouvrage. . . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . . . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .17

Enjeux et problématiques. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .18

Conseils méthodologiques. . . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . ..  . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .20
    Appréhender les textes et aboutir à une problématique. . 20
    Gérer son temps et s’appliquer à la mise en forme. . 23
    Les attentes du jury : écueils à éviter. . 24

Introduction. 27

Art et contestation / art and protest. . . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .27
A definition of art throughout the ages. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .29
Further definitions of art. . . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .34
Conclusions on the link between art and protest. . . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .35

THE ART OF SOCIAL CARICATURE


The artist as satirist. 39

The essay and the pamphlet: literary genres, political weapons. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .39
What’s in an essay?. . . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. .. . .. . .. . .. . .40
The essay and the pamphlet: similarities and differences. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .42

From Augustan satire to satire in the realistic novel. 45

Realism versus satire. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .45
Introducing satire. . . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. .. .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .46

The golden age of satire. 49

Horatian or Juvenalian satire?. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .50
    Horatian satire. . 50
    Juvenalian satire. . 50
The “Scriblerus” Club: Jonathan Swift and Alexander Pope. . . .. . .. . .. . .. . .51
    Alexander Pope’s The Rape of the Lock (1712): an example of Horatian satire. . 51
    Jonathan Swift’s Juvenalian satires. . 52
      • Gulliver’s Travels (1726) . 53
      • A Modest Proposal (1729). . 56
William Hogarth, chronicler of the lower classes. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .59
    The Rake’s Progress. . 59

Satire in the 19th-century realistic novel. 63

Thackeray’s Vanity Fair (1948). . . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. ... . .. . .63
Charles Dickens’ Hard Times (1854): a satire of the Industrial Revolution. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .... . .. . .65
George Eliot: bridging the gap between social realism and satire. . . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . . . .. . .69
Anthony Trollope’s The Way We Live Now (1875): satirizing capitalism unbound. . .. . .. . .. .. . .. . .71
“Nonsense” literature: an unexpected vehicle for satire. . . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .72
Oscar Wilde’s witty satire at the end of the Victorian era. . . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .74

Satire in American literature. 81

From pre-Civil War romance to the Progressive era . . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .81
Mark Twain’s satire of the romantic South. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .84

Satire at the turn of an “American” century: muckrakers and essayists. 89

Ambrose Bierce’s wicked sense of humour. . . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. .. . .89
H.L. Mencken, the irreverent “Sage of Baltimore”. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .91
Sinclair Lewis’s Babbitt (1922): a satire of the Progressive era. . .. . .. . .. . .94

Further developments of satire in Post-War American fiction. 99

Philip Roth’s postwar America: “putting the ire in satire”. . . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .100
Satire in fantasy and “dystopian” literature. . . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .106

Conclusion on satire. 109

THE POETICS OF MODERN PROTEST AND ACTIVISM IN AFRICAN AMERICAN WRITINGS & POLITICAL PERFORMANCE


From African American civil disobedience to the birth of modern activism. 117

North American slave narratives: tales of displacement, entrapment and escape. . . . . .. . . 118
    Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass,
    An American Slave (1845). . 119

What kind of protest?

Key African thinkers galvanizing the public debate: Booker T. Washington, Marcus Garvey and W. E. B. Du Bois. . . . .121
    Booker T. Washington and the Tuskegee model. . 121
    Marcus Garvey’s Pan-Africanism. . 122
    W. E. B. Du Bois: Warning Against the Dangers of Separatism. . . . . . . 123
Modern voices inscribing the African American “I” on the literary map. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125
    The Harlem Renaissance: a rootless movement giving African Americans their first artistic voice of protest. . 125
    The hope for a new America: the poetry of Langston Hughes. . 127
    Ralph Ellison’s Invisible Man (1952): Halting on the Path to Visibility. . 130
Protest movements to counter the stasis: the African American march to freedom. . . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. .  . .135
    Key events in the civil rights movement. . .. 135
    The Poetics of Activism in Martin Luther King’s Speeches . 136
    Last Campaigns and the End of the Civil Rights Movement. . 143
Freed African American voices rising in poetry and song: Maya Angelou and Nina Simone. . . .. . . .. . .145
    Maya Angelou: I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings . 145
    A Singular Raised Voice: how Nina Simone turned the civil rights movement into music. . 151
    LeRoi Jones, Robert Hayden, and Gwendolyn Brooks: “Afro-American” literary activists. . 154
Neo-slave narratives: remembering the African American foundation story. . . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .156
    Toni Morrison’s Beloved (1987):
    Summoning the Ghost(s) of Slavery. . 156

Resistance as performance, from the Black Panthers to Black Lives Matter. 163

The Black Panthers’ theatrical politics. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .... . .163
    The rhetoric of Malcolm X and the theatre of LeRoi Jones / Amiri Baraka. . 166
    Angela Davis: an icon polarizing Black Power . 168
    Performativity and political theatre adapted to the streets. . 170
From Hip Hop to Black Lives Matter: furthering the Panthers’ legacy, engendering new politics of protest. ..171
    Black Lives Matter. . 174

THE PERSONAL IS THE POLITICAL: FEMINIST POETRY AND THE POETICS OF WOMEN’S RIGHTS

A brief overview of second wave feminism in the 1960’s and 1970’s. . . . . . . . . . . .  . . . . . 179
The art of consciousness-raising. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .183
    Audre Lorde’s visionary poetics: poetry as consciousness-raising. . 185
    Conclusion on the poetics of the women’s movement. . 188
From the 2017 women’s march on washington to the age of #MeToo. . .. . .... . ... . .. . .. . .190
    #MeToo. . 194


PROTEST AND THE VISUAL ARTS


The image in American culture. 199

An overview of the evolution of image culture in the U.S. . . .. . .. . .. . .. . .199
The Great Depression and the documentary photograph: Dorothea Lange and Walker Evans. . ..  ... . .201
    Dorothea Lange’s Migrant Mother. . 202
    Walker Evans. . 204
From the documentary photograph to moving images . . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .208
    Hollywood movies and the age of censorship. . 208
    Television: maintaining a conservative hold on the nation. . 210
    The death of photojournalism and the fading out of censorship. . 210
    The birth of a new image culture. . 211
    The 2000’s: image overflow. . 213

Contemporary art and protest. 215

Pop Art, from espousing to denouncing the culture of materialism. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. .. . .. . .. . . .. . .. . .. . .216
    Conclusions on Pop art. . 217

Art and protest and protest art, from the 1980’s onwards. . . . . . . 219
    Barbara Kruger. . 219
    Keith Haring (1958-1990). . .. 220
    ACT UP art collectives’ shock guerrilla art. . 220
    Banksy, guerrilla street artist. . 221
    The Guerrilla Girls, feminist avengers of the art world. . 222
    The Femen’s “sextremist” demonstrations. . 223
    Conclusion on women and / in the art sphere: from making the personal political to being artists in their own right. . 224

OUTILS


Annexes. 229

Exemples de dossiers autour de “art et contestation”. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .229
    Dossier 1. . 229
      • Document A. . 229
      • Document B. . 230
      • Document C. . 233
      • Pistes d’exploitation. . 233
    Dossier 2. . 239
      • Document A. . 239
      • Document B. . 240
      • Document C. . 243
      • Pistes d’exploitation. . 247
    Dossier 3 : EMSP (Épreuve de Mise en Situation Professionnelle). . 250
      • Consigne . 250
      • Document A. . 250
      • Document B. . 252
      • Document C. . 254
      • Pistes de correction. . 254

Bibliographie. 267


Glossaire. 273

Laure Canadas, agrégée d’Anglais, enseigne au lycée Jean-Pierre Vernant à Sèvres. Elle y a enseigné en classe préparatoire littéraire, en section européenne ainsi qu’en enseignement de spécialité LLCER. Elle s’est spécialisée dans la littérature américaine du vingtième siècle.

A Singular Raised Voice: how Nina Simone turned the civil rights movement into music


A contemporary of Maya Angelou’s, Nina Simone (1933-2003) also participated in the civil rights marches side by side with Martin Luther King Jr. Raised in a poor yet educated family in North Carolina, Simone later described herself as a child prodigy who picked up the piano during one of her mother’s sermons in the Methodist church of her childhood. Her parents encouraged her desire to become one of America’s first black classical pianists, and uncharacteristically for the times helped her pursue that goal until her first experience with racism at the age of 12 made Nina Simone acknowledge for the first time that her dream might be out of reach. Before the start of her first recital, as her parents were asked to sit at the back of the audience in order to free their seats for a white couple, the young Simone stood up and asked for them to be seated at the front so they could hear her play, threatening not to do so until the situation had changed. This activist stance would continue throughout her life. A second traumatic scene, whereby she was refused entrance into the Curtis Institute of Music in Philadelphia after a summer spent preparing for it at the Julliard school of music in New York, made her decide once and for all that she would make of her music the locus of the fight for black rights. She thereby renounced a career as a classical pianist and accepted to sing along with her music, in a singularly inspired posture that would at once offset her audience’s expectations and ease, and entice its characteristic attention.